How this culture sexualizes little girls when they buy their first swimsuits

I'm not sure if a man is welcome to post in this forum, but I have a question that maybe women can answer better than men can. In fact, men can't really answer this question honestly at all.

It occurred to me that there is a way our culture sexualizes women from the time they are toddlers. Little girls' swimsuits are always designed like adult women's swimsuits, in that they cover the chest area as either a bra or as a one-piece. Even when their chests are identical to those of a boy, it seems girls get the impression that their chest areas are special "naughty" areas like crotches, and that decency requires them to cover up that area.

And society, with rare exceptions, discourages topless bathing for women at any age. In a public area like a municipal pool or a beach in the United States, the girls are likely to be reprimanded or even denied admittance if they show up topless regardless of their breast development. Meanwhile, boys haven't been required to cover their chests since long before World War II.

My question is; how did pre-teen girls feel about this? Were they aware of this double standard? Did they consider it unjust, or was it just one of the many silly things that grownups require and have to be observed? Or did they consider it a necessary part of their swim wear, just like their mother's bathing suit, or their aunt's or their big sisters, reinforcing their self-image as females?

If I were a young girl swimming with young boys and was required to wear a one-piece or a bra, I think that my take-away on that was that my chest was somehow sacred area, or a "dirty" part of my body, and something to be shameful of when it was exposed. That's one of the differences between the ways girls are brought up and boys are brought up.. Their body images are not likely to be identical when they are held to different standards.

I'm posting in this forum to learn how women nudists reacted to this in their youth, and if it presented a particular challenge to unlearn this taboo and, if they were mothers, how they dealt with their own daughters when the kids asked why the double standard existed.

Now I'll sit back and do me some learning.

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RE:How this culture sexualizes little girls when they buy their first swimsuits

Look at the two pics on the right.

Ask yourself if this is (not the correct forum) the correct site to ask about sexualising women?

Goodbye post.

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RE:How this culture sexualizes little girls when they buy their first swimsuits

I'm not sure if a man is welcome to post in this forum, but I have a question that maybe women can answer better than men can. In fact, men can't really answer this question honestly at all.I'm posting in this forum to learn how women nudists reacted to this in their youth, and if it presented a particular challenge to unlearn this taboo and, if they were mothers, how they dealt with their own daughters when the kids asked why the double standard existed.Now I'll sit back and do me some learning.

Disclaimer: I'm a guy, too.

But I talked about this to a friend of mine I'd met in the FKK. There, children are raised as nudists and this whole bathing suit thing doesn't come up. But when she went to a non-nudist municipal swimming pool as a child, she was told that she had to put a shirt on along with the shorts that all the kids wore. It never occurred to her before that the top of her body had to be concealed for decency's sake, although the boys could go around shirtless. She felt insulted and shamed to be singled out. She felt like Eve being expelled from the Garden of Eden, she said, forced to put on fig leaves for some sin she didn't know she'd committed.

I've never talked to any of my US wives or girlfriends about this, though. So I don't know what their attitude is. I, too, would like to learn.

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RE:How this culture sexualizes little girls when they buy their first swimsuits

Look at the two pics on the right.Ask yourself if this is (not the correct forum) the correct site to ask about sexualising women?Goodbye post.

Well, I don't select the pictures, but I see your point. This site, like too many on the Internet, uses young, sexy bodies -- mainly female -- on their intro pages to get people hooked. But I was hoping that there would be some women who could give me honest answers to my questions, since they were the ones who were presumably being sexualized. If you don't want to be that woman, fine.

I am making what is perhaps an erroneous assumption: that there really are women on this site who are committed nudists, and that some of them have encountered the situation I was describing. I wanted to hear their stories about growing up female in a society that assigns them taboos about their bodies that male kids don't have.

I do want to thank Woodsman for his comment on his FKK friend. But that's one story, secondhand.

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RE:How this culture sexualizes little girls when they buy their first swimsuits

I do want to thank Woodsman for his comment on his FKK friend. But that's one story, secondhand.

You're welcome, buddy.

One thing I just noticed. When you click on a man's profile, you see the international symbol for "man" which is a stick figure. On the women's profiles, you see the international symbol for "woman" which is ... a stick figure with a dress. Kind of strange for a nudist site, right?

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RE:How this culture sexualizes little girls when they buy their first swimsuits

One thing I just noticed. When you click on a man's profile, you see the international symbol for "man" which is a stick figure. On the women's profiles, you see the international symbol for "woman" which is ... a stick figure with a dress. Kind of strange for a nudist site, right?

Good catch!

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RE:How this culture sexualizes little girls when they buy their first swimsuits

One thing I just noticed. When you click on a man's profile, you see the international symbol for "man" which is a stick figure. On the women's profiles, you see the international symbol for "woman" which is ... a stick figure with a dress. Kind of strange for a nudist site, right?Good catch!

Just go and read specific literature about the topic. There are plenty of research about it. What you are discussing here is something that literally everybody nows and perceive in many scenarios. Unfortunately women always have been way more sexualized than men. Even in this site, where you should expect men to be more respectful and familiar with the beauty of a woman naked body, you still perv old men even with very young girl! Disgusting! In the end this problem its more cultural and men unfortunately have a big influence on this.

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RE:How this culture sexualizes little girls when they buy their first swimsuits

I think you were maybe responding to Jehoram's comment rather than mine. I was just pointing out the irony of using clothed figures to designate gender on a nudist site.

As for Jehoram's comments, it seems that his question was directed to females and to whether they realized the discrimination they were experiencing. I'm still hoping that some women will recount their own experiences with this. I already know how women are, in the main, regarded as sex objects even in nudist environments. All you have to do to prove this is to go to the "gallery" section of this site and see how women are disproportionately featured in the "most popular" downloads.

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RE:How this culture sexualizes little girls when they buy their first swimsuits

I'm still hoping that some women will recount their own experiences with this.

Well, I've posted this question in another forum. I received answers from two women so far, and both of them said that they thought that their swimsuits were patterned after women's swimsuits. And since they wanted to dress up like grown women do, they took the chest-covering one-piece or two-piece with a bra in stride. They didn't seem to come away with the idea that their chests were sources of shame.

I'll keep people posted on this as I get the responses. And please, any ladies who are watching this thread, chime in.

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RE:How this culture sexualizes little girls when they buy their first swimsuits

Well, that other forum I was talking about has evidently decided that it wasn't a fit topic for discussion and has pulled the thread. So it's up to us now.

There was one more comment from a woman before the thread was pulled. She said that, like the FKK girl, she saw no reason to wear a bra as a child, but she reiterated the idea that girls had a lot of social pressure to "dress like grown-ups" and if that included wearing a bra, then so be it. One amusing comment was that when she was fitted for a "training bra" after her first period, she regarded it as a "ceremonial sash" (her words). I'm guessing that meant that the bra was something that you wore not for utility or even modesty, but something that proclaimed an advance in your social status, like the baldrics you see on the nobility.

Since the thread no longer exists on the other forum, it's up to you ladies on this forum to add anything to the topic, if you like. Otherwise, I'll just consider this thread to be dead.

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RE:How this culture sexualizes little girls when they buy their first swimsuits

Fascinating topic actually, and understandably not easy for people to discuss. Societal expectations set the standards for so many things in our lives and clothing is no exception. One thing Ive studied up on is the macro and micro societal influences. Theres plenty of research out there that I wont bore you with, but my personal experience on this topic as it relates to youth attire... I used to vacation in the summer with my family at another familys home in the rural area of Pennsylvania, far away from the repressive suburbs I was raised. There, boys and girls remains topless constantly. The expectations there were more around the individual and the family interactions. Back at home, there was the constant pressure to look and act older than you were, so ones attire meant more to the world that the individual under the cloths. I lived in the two worlds most of my life and its painful. Clothing is a topic that deserves much more discussion around its influence on identity and sexuality. Thanks for listening :)

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