RE:Mastercard compliance and Media uploads

Funny how my previous post was deleted and BigDudeMan's was heavily edited (censored) . Seems like unwarranted tracking is not the only think to be concerned about...............

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RE:Mastercard compliance and Media uploads

Sorry Mr Sun, but my comment is as exactly as I left it. I dont know why yours disappeared.

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RE:Mastercard compliance and Media uploads

My post is gone too!

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RE:Mastercard compliance and Media uploads

My comments were a follow-up to FreeLee's. They are ALSO gone. Let's see if THIS one remains!

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RE:Mastercard compliance and Media uploads

At the bottom of the page is the following:

"This site is only available to users 18 and over and we use cookies
We use cookies for functionality, social media, and google analytics. To view our cookie policy please view Our Cookie Policy"

What exactly are Google Analytics:

Google Analytics is used to track website activity such as session duration, pages per session, bounce rate etc. of individuals using the site, along with the information on the source of the traffic.

Can Google Analytics Identify you:

Google Analytics can provide some information on who is visiting your website via the Network Report. The Google Analytics Network Report stores Service Provider data to show which service provider visitors are using to access your site.

How does Google Analytics Work?

Simply put, Google Analytics puts several lines of tracking code into the code of your website. The code records various activities of your users when they visit your website, along with the attributes (such as age, gender, interests) of those users. It then sends all that information to the GA (Google Analytics) server once the user exits your website.

Next, Google Analytics aggregates the data collected from your website in multiple ways, primarily by four levels:

User level (related to actions by each user)
Session level (each individual visit)
Pageview level (each individual page visited)
Event level (button clicks, video views, etc)

The bottom line with all of this is that if you want to share your personal information knowing that it is NOT safe or protected, then go right ahead. Others who value their individual privacy and resent other sites from either directly or indirectly (through third parties) selling your information to make money from your personal information, then go right ahead and share anything and everything.

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RE:Mastercard compliance and Media uploads

How do hidden web trackers put my privacy at risk?

Hidden trackers can follow you around the Internet and watch much of what you do online, but there are simple tools
you can use to help block them. Before I get into how to do that, lets look at what web trackers are, and how exactly they put your privacy at risk.

What are web trackers?

Simply put, web trackers are pieces of code that let companies spy on your online activity across the web, resulting in detailed data profiles about you. These profiles are based in part on what websites you visit, what you click on, and more.

When you visit a website, its very likely that first-party and third-party trackers are lurking in the background, monitoring your behavior. These are the two types of tracking you should be aware of. First-party tracking means tracking from the owner of the site youre visiting or from any of its service providers that are only allowed to use the data as the owner of the site instructs. This type of tracking is usually expected.

However, youre often also observable on websites by third-party trackers embedded in website code that can use the data they collect for purposes other than just what the website instructs. These third-party trackers are from companies outside of the organization you are visiting and who are not bound strictly as service providers typically are.

You might be surprised to learn that the vast majority
(70%+) of websites include such third-party trackers. Lurking behind the scenes, these third-party trackers collect your data for a variety of reasons, including advertising, analytics, and social media.

Websites usually embed these third-party trackers voluntarily into their website code because they are useful to the website in some way. For example, the biggest third-party tracker is Google Analytics, which tells companies what visitors are doing on their sites. However, the way the agreement with Google usually works is that Google can also use this information for other purposes, like for their own targeted advertising and search results, unrelated to the website you are visiting or its companys purposes. Thats where the bulk of the trouble lies.

How do third-party trackers put my privacy at risk?

Each bit of third-party tracking code embedded in sites and apps can expose pieces of your personal information to the company behind the associated tracker. Further, if the same tracker is littered across many of the websites and apps you use every day, it's easy to see how the company behind it can combine the data its tracker collects to create a massive data collection of a lot of your online activity.

Thats how these trackers (and the companies behind them the biggest being Google and Facebook) can develop extensive profiles on individualseven individuals who dont have accounts with the associated companiesthat include browsing, location, search, and purchase history. These profiles can be used to target you for anything, including something were all too familiar with: following you around the web with creepy advertising. Youve probably encountered this yourself, where the advertising you see reflects facts about your life, from events like marriage or a surprise birthday celebration to information like travel plans or medical conditions.

But its not just advertising. These same profiles are also often used to decide what content youre shown, which can put you in a filter bubble. At a societal level, this type of targeting and filter bubble manipulations have contributed to problems like political polarization, ad discrimination, and misinformation online.

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RE:Mastercard compliance and Media uploads

At the bottom of the page is the following:"This site is only available to users 18 and over and we use cookiesWe use cookies for functionality, social media, and google analytics. To view our cookie policy please view Our Cookie Policy"What exactly are Google Analytics:Google Analytics is used to track website activity such as session duration, pages per session, bounce rate etc. of individuals using the site, along with the information on the source of the traffic.Can Google Analytics Identify you:Google Analytics can provide some information on who is visiting your website via the Network Report. The Google Analytics Network Report stores Service Provider data to show which service provider visitors are using to access your site.How does Google Analytics Work?Simply put, Google Analytics puts several lines of tracking code into the code of your website. The code records various activities of your users when they visit your website, along with the attributes (such as age, gender, interests) of those users. It then sends all that information to the GA (Google Analytics) server once the user exits your website.Next, Google Analytics aggregates the data collected from your website in multiple ways, primarily by four levels:User level (related to actions by each user)Session level (each individual visit)Pageview level (each individual page visited)Event level (button clicks, video views, etc)The bottom line with all of this is that if you want to share your personal information knowing that it is NOT safe or protected, then go right ahead. Others who value their individual privacy and resent other sites from either directly or indirectly (through third parties) selling your information to make money from your personal information, then go right ahead and share anything and everything.

I still go back the fact that it is highly likely, almost certain, that this site has been using such tools for quite some time. And the only difference now is that there is a message telling you that they are doing it and you accept that fact.
EU Law actually states that a website must to this when you access it for the first time, and should offer you the chance to configure what types of cookies etc you agree to accept. I dont think the site actually meets EU Law in that regards despite the number of members it has there.
Dont like it then use private browsing mode, a vpn and disable cross platform tracking on those devices that support it.
Also surprised that the 18+/certified criteria is only being applied to posting material. Many regions would restrict the viewing to 18+ because of the nudity content. And you can actually access/view a lot of this site without actually agreeing that you are 18+/agree to the cookies.
Sorry for those of you who dont like it but I can only see things getting stricter as we move forward on this site and others. It isnt the site owners who want to do this. It is countries legal systems that are imposing it. And that is driven by the abuse of the internet and social media by a minority of users.

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RE:Mastercard compliance and Media uploads

I still go back the fact that it is highly likely, almost certain, that this site has been using such tools for quite some time.

I agree. The point that I was making is that the site owner has the option to use or not use first party user information but not using this information does not mean that user information will still not be gathered and used by a third party. Users are still at risk regardless of what site owners do. In addition, what is driving this trend towards more restrictions and the gathering of more information is what Google Analytics (the worlds largest data gathering system) sees as an opportunity to make money. Money is the real driver behind most things in life. Alleged deviant and abusive behavior really does not enter into the picture as to the reason why more information gathering is required. What has also changed ( as you say) are the recent law changes that require sites to inform users that their personal information is being gathered and then allow them to make the decision if they want to freely give up their information. This trend will only continue to get worse until the point is reached when sites deemed not worthy of meeting pure and innocent societal standards will be put out of business. The handwriting unfortunately is on the wall for sites like this and it will only be a matter of time before the inevitable occurs.

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RE:Mastercard compliance and Media uploads

I wish this website will be improved over time. I got certified even I'm not going to post my nude pictures. Just to let people know I'm a real person and bring some trust to a profile.

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RE:Mastercard compliance and Media uploads

There's some really good info here. Also, I'd like to add there are a number of browser addons that can be used which serves to block non essential trackers (among other undesirables) depending on your browser of choice which you can get. examples: ghostery, or ublock/ublock origin.

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